MontBlanc
0
No products in the cart.
Podcast

Sharon Carlson
Long Trip Alone

December 22, 2020, Author: Melissa Adams
fi_97_s03e30

fi_97_s03e30

Episode Description:

Sharon Carlson, a 31 year breast cancer survivor, joined me on this episode to share her story behind the pink ribbon. Sharon was in her early 40s when she was diagnosed in 1989. She talked about find the lump, her diagnosis, the horribly tragic story of her primary doctor, her treatments, and the loneliness she experienced that led her to become an advocate for others.

Show Notes:

Sharon Carlson, a 31-year breast cancer survivor, joined me on this episode to share her story behind the pink ribbon. Sharon was in her early 40s when she was diagnosed in 1989. She talked about finding the lump, her diagnosis, the horribly tragic story of her primary doctor, her treatments, and the loneliness she experienced that led her to become an advocate for others.

Show Notes:
Sharon Carlson was in her early 40s when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1989. She found a lump in her breast while taking a shower. After consulting with her primary care physician who did not think it was breast cancer, she sought a second opinion and was told that she had very bad breast cancer. At that time, they didn’t stage or grade tumors.

Sharon underwent a radical mastectomy on her left breast followed by a year of chemotherapy. She shared that she had her head packed in ice to prevent her hair from falling out, which worked. At the time of her treatment, there was no knowledge for ER/PR positive or negative, or HER2. Reconstruction was not an option at that time and being flat just became a part of her life.

Five years after her own diagnosis, Sharon’s mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Sharon recalls that breast cancer was not talked about then because it was considered a death sentence. Sharon’s mother passed away from breast cancer, which was the pivotal moment when Sharon decided that she needed to stand up and become an advocate and a voice for other women.

One of the hardest parts of Sharon’s breast cancer diagnosis was the lack of a support group or other women to talk about breast cancer. While she had a great support system with her family, coworkers, and her church, she wishes that there had been someone for her to talk to about breast cancer, to ask questions, and relate her experiences. Cancer is a pretty lonely journey. If Sharon had just had someone’s hand to hold, it would have been much easier.

Sign Up Now

Sign up now for the official Behind the Pink Ribbon newsletter, and get the FREE BCS Resource Guide!